For The Love Of Language Resident blogger: Marisa Gomez

Follow Marisa weekly as she shares research, insight, and strategies for educators working with Second Language Learners.

  • Raising a Bilingual Child: 6 Ways to Keep Them Talking

    Raising a Bilingual Child: 6 Ways to Keep Them Talking

    Last week, we shared 6 Things You Need to Know about Raising a Bilingual Child. This week is about getting your child to stick with both languages. In most countries in the world, you can encounter more than one spoken language. But in most countries, there is a clear majority language. In the case of […]

  • Raising a Bilingual Child: 6 Things You Need to Know

    Raising a Bilingual Child: 6 Things You Need to Know

    Multilingual Parenting is a great website if you’re in a household that uses more than one language. Even if you, yourself speak only one language, there are many ways to support your budding bilingual child, but sometimes it’s hard to find resources on the web. I have not read the book by the website creator, […]

  • Do your students love technology? Teach them oral language with these 7 apps.

    Do your students love technology? Teach them oral language with these 7 apps.

      Kids these days… am I right? Technology has gotten increasingly intuitive to use, and the digital generation doesn’t miss a beat. The fantastic thing is that technology can be used in amazing ways for educational purposes. Whether you’d like an overt tool for getting students talking, or one that allows students to lower their […]

  • 4 ways to help your students communicate more formally

    4 ways to help your students communicate more formally

    Para leer este artículo en español, haz clic aquí. When I first started to learn Spanish, my teachers were sympathetic. It’s hard for English speakers to learn the tú/Usted (informal/formal “you”) distinction, so they graciously allowed students to “tutear” them, that is, speak to them with the informal tú. Keeping track of verb conjugations was hard […]

  • Circular writing and other horrors: Why your students may be better writers than you think

    Circular writing and other horrors: Why your students may be better writers than you think

    I was recently tasked with reviewing some writing task responses by 4th and 5th grade English learners. The responses had already been coded by some of my team members for various features – run-on sentences and fragments, capitalization and punctuation, misspellings, and so on – and I was comparing the coding for accuracy. One student […]

  • Here’s why even “bad” books are good books.

    Here’s why even “bad” books are good books.

    Did you ever see that movie Overboard with Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell? It’s one of my all-time favorites, for so many reasons. Goldie’s so wonderfully disdainful. The riches-to-rags contrast is so exaggerated. The miniature golf theme park is so whimsical. But I’ve always been struck by how the four boys go from being complete […]

  • 12 Things a Teacher of ELs Should Never Forget

    12 Things a Teacher of ELs Should Never Forget

    An elephant never forgets, and neither should we. Scholastic brings us back to basics with these tips for unlocking language. 1. Wait time. Do you ask questions while you teach? How long do you pause for students to answer? Chances are, it’s not long enough for your ELs. When learning a language, it takes a […]

  • Would you let your students cut your hair?

    Would you let your students cut your hair?

    Clase, quiero que me corten el cabello. Class, I want you to cut my hair. True words spoken by my native-Peruvian professor of Spanish. She explained that she couldn’t be bothered to spend money on a haircut when she didn’t care much how it looked, and it was just getting too long. She pulled some […]

  • Dirty words: What makes them taboo?

    Dirty words: What makes them taboo?

    This past weekend, I had the joy of lunching with my undergraduate advising professor. As a sociolinguist and professor of four romance languages, we share many interests, but one of our favorite topics is multilingual child-rearing. (Her English-Spanish-Italian-speaking 10-year-old was firmly in mind when I wrote this post.) Conversation turned, interestingly, to my squeamishness about […]

  • Your students may not know who they are. Are you to blame?

    Your students may not know who they are. Are you to blame?

    Suzy worked at a bank. She was a teller and a favorite among the regular customers because of her sharp wit and quirky style. Her name placard said Suzy, but that wasn’t her given name. Suzy, a Japanese woman who had lived in the US for almost 20 years, was actually Yasue (YAH-sue-eh), but it […]

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Marisa became interested in language education after ten years of gesture and pantomime with her Italian-speaking, live-in grandparents. She has an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She currently works for the Center for Applied Linguistics as a writer-researcher for the ACCESS for ELLs assessment administered by the WIDA consortium. Her classroom experience spans Montessori kindergarten, dual immersion (Spanish) kindergarten, K-6 pull-out ESL, adult ESL and EFL, and elementary EFL in the ex-Soviet Republic of Georgia. Marisa and her husband use both Spanish and English with their two young sons, with some Italian and Georgian thrown in for good measure.